2009 Gao Jia Shan "Wild Fu Zhuan" Hunan Brick Tea

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
banana, Grain, Herbaceous, Honey, Licorice, Mineral, Parsley, Peat, Plum, Raisins, Rice, Sweet, Tart, Wood
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 5 oz / 150 ml

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  • “This is a very comforting tea with an interesting mouthfeel. The texture is sticky, buttery, quite thick and at times bubbly. Compared to most other hei cha on the market, it seems to also produce...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

This is an early Gao Jia Shan production consisting of wild tea grown in the Yun Tai mountain area of An Hua county in Hunan at an altitude of 1000 meters. Although this is labelled a “Fu Zhuan” it’s devoid of golden flowers and acts a bit more like a “Hei Cha Zhuan”.

Stored in An Hua, Hunan since it’s production in 2009 this has aged into a thoroughly enjoyable and complex tea. The brewed tea has a molasses and tobacco aroma with a hint of smoke and the taste is sweet, fruity and creamy. It also has something akin to an aged dry Guangdong stored raw pu-erh tea. Cha Qi is strong!

Part of the Gao Jia Shan “Wild Tea” series ( in addition to this one 2012 Gao Jia Shan “Wild Tian Jian” in a Bamboo Basket).

2009 Pressing

400 Grams per brick

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

88
698 tasting notes

This is a very comforting tea with an interesting mouthfeel. The texture is sticky, buttery, quite thick and at times bubbly. Compared to most other hei cha on the market, it seems to also produce longer sessions.

In a preheated gaiwan, I get a peaty mineral scent. Once the leaves open up, there is a distinctive and unexpected banana aroma, complemented notes of wood, raisins, rice paper and parsley.

First infusion is sweet and woody, while the second tastes also of barley and licorice root. Third steep brings light plum tartness and subsequently the tea becomes quite mineral and herbaceous. Towards the end, however, the experience is dominated by sweetness that at times resembles winter honey.

In conlusion, the tea is easily one of the best fu zhuan I’ve tried. It is on the more expensive side of the spectrum, but the full body, moderately complex profile and good longevity justify its price for sure.

Flavors: banana, Grain, Herbaceous, Honey, Licorice, Mineral, Parsley, Peat, Plum, Raisins, Rice, Sweet, Tart, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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