2020 Yunnan Sourcing "Ye Cha" Single Grove Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apricot, Bitter, Butter, Floral, Garden Peas, Grass, Peach, Plants, Smoke, Smooth, Sugarcane, Sweet, Thick, Umami, Vegetal
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 5 oz / 140 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

0 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “This single-origin tea from Bang Dong carries a hefty price tag for a Lincang tea that’s neither Xigui nor Bing Dao. Although, Bang Dong is pretty close to the former of course. As one would expect...” Read full tasting note
    84

From Yunnan Sourcing

This year we were very lucky to be able to get about 7 kilograms of tea from a small grove of wild trees growing near Bang Dong village in Lincang. First flush tea was picked over the period of about 2 weeks. After processing into mao cha and harmonizing (the teas picked on different days are all blended together), the tea leaves were steamed and pressed into just 25 cakes!

The tea brews up a thick full-bodied tea soup that is incredibly complex. Sweet, bitter, lightly floral with umami and the slightest feeling of brine. Steeps many many times! An incredibly balanced tea with strong cha qi!

Net Weight: 200 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
Harvest time: April 2020
Harvest Area: Bang Dong county, Lincang Prefecture
Total Production amount: 7 kilograms (35 cakes)

Wrapper Illustration by Simone Shelley

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

84
656 tasting notes

This single-origin tea from Bang Dong carries a hefty price tag for a Lincang tea that’s neither Xigui nor Bing Dao. Although, Bang Dong is pretty close to the former of course. As one would expect from a production made from a small number of trees, it is an extremely clean tasting tea that isn’t as complex as some other gu shu in this price range. The profile is vegetal with some umami and mild sweetness. Mouthfeel is thick and oily, but also quite airy in the beginning. It is not among the most full-bodied ones, but there is an interesting bite to the texture. I wouldn’t call the cha qi overly strong or aggressive either. However, its calming and uplifting effect lasts for hours.

I didn’t get a whole lot of notes as far as aromas are concerned. The dry leaf scent is quite unusual though and it reminds me of peach and apricot pits.

The taste is grassy, vegetal and cooling initially. Bitterness appears around steep 4, but it never becomes abrasive. Overall, I found the bitterness here to be particularly interesting. It is very much in the background and yet very present in the way that it round up the profile.

With infusions 5 – 12 one gets the most pungent and full-bodied brews. Throughout the session, however, both the texture and the taste remain extremely smooth. Flavours of butter, alpine meadow and clean smoke appear in the middle. Then, around steep 9, the profile moves into a more floral and nutty territory. Notes of coffee and various seeds and oils are to be found here. The tea remains floral until the end, complemented by a sort of medicinal character.

The aftertaste is very expansive, fresh and cooling initially. It is neither too sweet nor flowery. There are notes of garden peas, sunflower oil, plant roots and sugarcane that arise beside the ones mentioned already.

All in all, a very nice tea to experience, but not one I am likely to seek in the future given its price.

Flavors: Apricot, Bitter, Butter, Floral, Garden Peas, Grass, Peach, Plants, Smoke, Smooth, Sugarcane, Sweet, Thick, Umami, Vegetal

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 5 OZ / 140 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.