2020 Yunnan Sourcing "Wu Liang Mountain" Aged Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu'erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Ash, Bread, Coriander Seed, Herbaceous, Lavender, Mushrooms, Plants, Smooth, Sour, Spicy, Sweet, Tangy, Thick, Wood
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cameron B.
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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  • “I wonder about the reasons for a tea being left as mao cha for 13 years, but at least we get to see an example of uncompressed transformation here. One thing is for sure, there are a lot of stems...” Read full tasting note
    77

From Yunnan Sourcing

Wu Liang Mountain First Flush of Spring 2007 tea leaves were picked and processed into mao cha (loose leaf raw pu-erh tea) and then aged for 13 years in Jinggu county of Simao. The storage condition in Jinggu was clean with a moderate amount of humidity (wetter than Kunming, but not as wet as Guangdong) giving the nice a rounded aged taste!

The tea itself is burly and largish attesting to it’s originating from mature tea trees (not plantation tea). It can be brewed many times and imparts a balanced cha qi.

357 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
First Flush of Spring 2007 Harvested Tea from Wu Liang Mountain in Simao
100 kilograms in total produced (280 cakes)
March 20th 2020 Pressing Date
Wrapper Illustration by Alan Behul

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

77
947 tasting notes

I wonder about the reasons for a tea being left as mao cha for 13 years, but at least we get to see an example of uncompressed transformation here. One thing is for sure, there are a lot of stems so the visual aspect could be one of the reasons why it didn’t get sold earlier, together with the fact that Wu Liang is quite remote and isn’t exactly renowned among tea buyers.

Overall, the tea is not bad, but not anything special either. It satisfies the itch when you want a comforting and clean stored semi-aged sheng with a very woody profile and a smooth texture. However, I feel like one can probably get a better price for comparable teas in this category as well.

The mouthfeel, for one, is pretty decent. It has a buttery character and commendable thickness. The taste is woody and tangy with medium sweetness and sourness as well as a floral bitterness in the finish. Specfic flavours include ones like bread, coriander seeds, fenugreek leaves, lavender and ash. The aftertaste is spicy, cooling and herbaceous with a protracted sour bite and a faint mushroom flavour. The hui gan is fairly weak to be honest.

Flavors: Ash, Bread, Coriander Seed, Herbaceous, Lavender, Mushrooms, Plants, Smooth, Sour, Spicy, Sweet, Tangy, Thick, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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