2007 Bai Sha Xi "Qian Liang Cha" Hunan Hei Cha Tea

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Coffee, Compost, Cut Grass, Dried Fruit, Dry Grass, Grain, Mint, Mushrooms, Oats, Raisins, Smooth, Sweet, Tart, Wood, Yeast, Hay, Oak, Peat Moss, Smoke, Spicy
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This tea resembles an aged sheng to me, coupled with the yeasty quality that seems to be characteristic of qian liang. It’s a decent one, but nothing I’d go crazy about. The aroma is earthy with...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “This tea on opening the plastic bag it was wrapped in immediately hit me with a bit of a wave of fermented funk, now dont get me wrong , it was funky in all the right ways a well aged heicha...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Yunnan Sourcing

Bai Sha Xi production made from 2007 Spring tea leaves. Pressed into a huge 36 kilogram column called “Qian Liang Cha” (aka 1000 catty tea) and then aged for 11 years before we purchased a whole column and then cut into slices and re-packaged into white wrapper 680-780 grams cake. (If you want to get whole “cake” choose the 800 grams option and you’ll get a whole cake + some pieces to get the overall weight up to 800 grams. (example: you might get a 710 gram “cake” and a few chunks totaling 90 grams).

We are also offering small cubes of this tea as for sampling. They are roughly 10 grams each but can vary by weight and size, and as such are sold by weight.

Qian Liang tea is compressed in a long column (typically 36kg) through a laborious process that involves steaming the leaves and funneling them into a three layered cylinder of woven bamboo. Then a team of 5 to 8 people will simultaneously compress the tea using leverage and then tighten each section with thick bamboo stripling. Once firmly compressed the Qian Liang “logs” are dried in the sun and then finally cured for months in an indoor warehouse. In this form they can be aged for decades or even centuries without molding, only improving in taste, aroma and complexity with each passing year!

The taste is spicy, sweet, thick, with hints of brewer’s yeast and mushrooms. Really kind of difficult to describe, so we would encourage you to purchase the lesser amount first to see if you like it.

Spring 2007 harvest tea leaves, stored as a 36.25 kilogram column in An Hua County of Hunan until October 2018 when it was cut up into “cakes” and moved to Kunming.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

78
716 tasting notes

This tea resembles an aged sheng to me, coupled with the yeasty quality that seems to be characteristic of qian liang. It’s a decent one, but nothing I’d go crazy about.

The aroma is earthy with notes of bulgur, used ground coffee beans, light smoke, dried fruit (raisins) and decaying grass. The taste profile is actually very similar. Some other flavours include mushrooms, oats, yeast, and mint. Initially, there is a woody sweetness, which becomes more fruity towards the end, coupled with more tart and dry grass notes. The aftertaste is not particularly memorable, but it is interesting to note that the sweetness there is more of the milky kind. It’s a medium-bodied tea with a slick and slightly oily texture to it.

Flavors: Coffee, Compost, Cut Grass, Dried Fruit, Dry Grass, Grain, Mint, Mushrooms, Oats, Raisins, Smooth, Sweet, Tart, Wood, Yeast

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 130 ML

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85
109 tasting notes

This tea on opening the plastic bag it was wrapped in immediately hit me with a bit of a wave of fermented funk, now dont get me wrong , it was funky in all the right ways a well aged heicha should. Peat, grass, hay, wet wood.

I prepared it in a clay gaiwan that is seasoned for puerh and heicha. I heated it and put the tea in and got a little bit of smoke aroma from the tea now in addition to the ferment. Then giving the tea a short rinse and I got a little more smoke and ferment and a bit of like dark fruit, though I couldnt put my finger on which.

Brewing the tea for like 15 seconds and straining, this tea has a bit of tea floating particles from the breaking up process. I got a dark amber color, reminiscent of darker honey. The aroma calmed down a bit and the flavor of the first brew was slightly sweet , spicy and smokey.

The second brew is slightly stronger and more intense but much the same as the first. Never any bitterness.

Third and fourth brew also got a little stronger with a slight drying sensation, but not really bitterness or astringency. Also the tea has a nice long aftertaste of dark oak wood and dark fruits.

This tea brewed about 10-12 times before giving up, and got sweeter and mellower along the way. I recommend this tea to anyone who wants to dip their toe in heicha. I also think another couple years of storage will help it immensely.

Flavors: Dry Grass, Hay, Oak, Peat Moss, Smoke, Spicy, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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