2006 "Pasha Mountain Gu Shu" Guangdong Aged Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bitter, Camphor, Chestnut, Nuts, Nutty, Sweet, Vegetal, Vinegar, Walnut, Astringent, Mineral, Musty, Raisins, Wood, Honey, Tobacco, Heavy, Smooth, Sour, Spicy, Broth, Butterscotch, Coffee, Spices, Wet Rocks
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 oz / 106 ml

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7 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I still have a couple of samples from derk to go through, this being one ticked off the list today. It’s a nice semi-aged tea that’s different from the ones I own in a similar age category. Instead...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “Aged tobacco, cream of wheat, and camphor are primary flavors. Secondary notes of hardwood, black walnut, raisin, date, and horehound. Floral and sweet mineral develops on the palate in...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “Rinsed once with boiling water. First infusion was alright, generally minerally but a bit blunt with everything jumbled together (possibly because I went a bit long – 10s steep + my pot has a 10s...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “Strong, heavy body with a very smooth texture and complex composition of bitter, astringent, woody, sweet, discreetly moist and a subtle acidity, all in all a very nice spicy flavour, which...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Yunnan Sourcing

This is a spring 2006 Pasha Mountain raw pu-erh tea cake that has been aged in Guangdong dry storage condition for about 11 years. The taste is smooth and mellow with good body and strong mouth-feel. There is a lingering camphor taste that has developed with age, and the tea soup is copper colored. There is a good balance of bitterness and astringency that has dissipated considerably due to it’s age and storage condition. This tea is recommended for those who like strong teas with a good balance of age and complexity.

Each tong of 7 cakes is wrapped in bamboo leaf!

Tea weight: 357 grams (+/- 10 grams)
Vintage: Spring 2006
Producer: Ban Zhang Lao Zhai Tea Factory
Area: Pasha Mountain area of Menghai County, Xishuangbanna

About Pasha Mountain:

Pasha in the Aini language means tall and straight forest. According to local people, Pasha was settled more than 300 years ago by people from the Jinghong and Damenglong area of Xishuangbanna. At that time the area had no villages or cultivated land within 10 kilometers and was dominated by vast mountains filled with giant ancient tea trees. The Aini people, through foresight and diligent work, created their home on this land, relying on tea to earn a living. Pasha Ancient Tea Mountain is located in Menghai county to the Southwest of Gelanghe tea mountain. The highest elevation is 1850 meters, with an average of 1700 meters (the sameas Lao Banzhang mountain). There are currently around 1000 acres of tea under cultivation. One hundred thirty years ago, the current Banzhang settlement was founded by residents of Pasha who moved there to cultivate tea. Pasha Ancient Tea Mountain is shrouded in fog year-round and features abundant rainfall. The tea producing area lies between 1600 and 1800m elevation and is in an area of luxuriant growth with rich ground cover and fertile soil. Tea tree growth is extremely productive, with an early budding period and long harvest periods, producing large healthy tea leaves with striking silver tips — excellent quality tea. Pasha organic arbor tea is made from selected ancient arbor leaves grown at an elevation of 1700 meters on Pasha Ancient Tea Mountain in Menghai county.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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7 Tasting Notes

83
700 tasting notes

I still have a couple of samples from derk to go through, this being one ticked off the list today. It’s a nice semi-aged tea that’s different from the ones I own in a similar age category. Instead of being herbaceuos or fruity, it is more on the nutty and bitter side.

In the aroma, I could smell some wet storage notes, but this didn’t translate into the taste. Instead, the profile was sweet, vegetal, bitter, and nutty (walnut skin, chestnut). The aftertaste was nicely warming with a touch of a camphor note to it.

I also quite liked the mouthfeel, something I often find to be a weak point of these kind of teas. It was soft and active with good viscosity, but felt light in the mouth at the same time. I also got a hint of a sedating sort of cha qi.

Flavors: Bitter, Camphor, Chestnut, Nuts, Nutty, Sweet, Vegetal, Vinegar, Walnut

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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86
167 tasting notes

Aged tobacco, cream of wheat, and camphor are primary flavors. Secondary notes of hardwood, black walnut, raisin, date, and horehound. Floral and sweet mineral develops on the palate in aftertaste.

It took me awhile to get into this one. It needs some space and some attention to fully reveal itself. That said, it is pretty complex when you allow it to develop.

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83
218 tasting notes

Rinsed once with boiling water.

First infusion was alright, generally minerally but a bit blunt with everything jumbled together (possibly because I went a bit long – 10s steep + my pot has a 10s pour time).

Afterwards, wet leaves smell like something comforting like clean tobacco / woodsmoke. Faintest whiff of light, clear honey or dried fruit.

Second infusion is nicer, clearer and more interesting notes. All three infusions not bitter or astringent, only the very slightest dry, pleasant saliva-stimulating mouthfeel.

It’s my first time brewing aged sheng pu-erh in my Yixing zisha pot and it’s been a much better experience than the young sheng I tried yesterday (2017 Autumn Da Qing Gu Shu). I guess the age mellows it out? With almost no bitterness or astringency, this is a very approachable first sheng pu-erh.

Increasing rating from 81 to 83. (25 Jun 2020)

Flavors: Honey, Mineral, Tobacco, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 130 ML

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85
126 tasting notes

Strong, heavy body with a very smooth texture and complex composition of bitter, astringent, woody, sweet, discreetly moist and a subtle acidity, all in all a very nice spicy flavour, which remindes me of the 2008 Bulang Ancient by EoT. In addition, there is an intensely relaxing Qi and surprisingly good leaves for a Factory Sheng. However, the storage was anything but “clean” and in spite of the age, the tea is still a little aggressive, which together gives some deduction regarding the rating.

Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2006-pasha-mountain-gu-shu

Flavors: Astringent, Bitter, Heavy, Smooth, Sour, Spicy, Sweet, Wood

Preparation
10 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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56 tasting notes

I bought the 357g sample of this tea a few months back, wanting to get some feel for Menghai-area material that’s not a big factory production, something priced as a daily drinker, and old enough to make orange soup. I consider this a success on all counts.

This is a stone-pressed cake that comes apart pretty easily. I don’t feel competent to judge tree age by looking at leaves, but this one is surely missing a 0 at the end of the price to be really “gu shu.” When I inspect the spent leaf, I don’t see the prominent lateral venation that is supposed to be characteristic of old-tree material.

I’ve had 6 or 8 sessions with it so far, some in porcelain gaiwans, some in clay pots. It makes decently thick orange soup for 8 or so steeps, obviously depending on details of steep time. I don’t ordinarily keep a steep count, or indeed make a point of precisely timing steeps, but I did a session with bookeeping to see how it would work out on this one. With a leaf ratio of 6.5g/90ml, I did a 5s rinse and a steeping schedule of 5, 5, 10, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90, 120, 150, 210, 300s. The light compression of stone pressing makes it reasonable to use very short steeps in the beginning. Really only the first 11 steeps were worthwhile, but this meets my standards for daily drinker teas. The soup gradually lightens to a pale orange starting around #10.

This tea has a good aged feel for something only 11 years old, yet the taste is of clean dry storage with no hint of shicang. The spent leaf is almost entirely brown with very little trace of green. There is good huigan for several steeps starting with the 6th, using a steep schedule like the one given above, with some green astringency in the last few steeps.

By comparison with Dayi products of similar vintage, I believe I detect a characteristic Menghai origin here, with less complexity owing to the fact that this is single-mountain material and not a blend. A Dayi cake of this age would still have lots of room to improve, with lots of strong astringent green pucker at the end, but I think this one is close to as good as it will ever be. As I write this I am drinking a 2007 Dayi 8542 shortly after a session with the Pasha, and the Dayi is clearly superior tea. I do not regret buying the Pasha though, because it is exactly what I was paying for: raw puer that’s more aged than matured, good for 10 steeps, and priced for daily drinking.

I recommend this tea if you want something for drinking, and not for raving about steep counts.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 90 ML

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90
318 tasting notes

My first impression of this tea sample was “too wet”, but after letting it acclimate for a week or two it’s a very different tea. My sample is tightly compressed and appears to be from the “beenghole” so I gave it a wash and let it open up for about five minutes.

Brews a medium orange. It has a slight mulch-y note in the beginning, but that fades with subsequent infusions. It has a very prominent butterscotch sweetness as well as notes of wet rocks, chestnut, and lightly roasted coffee. The soup has a broth-y quality and slight spiciness that reminds me of a good bowl of pho. Like Scott says this tea has a good balance of age and complexity.

I like this one quite a bit and think it will improve with further dry storage. I’ve been wanting to grow my collection of aged/semi-aged sheng and I think a cake of this and the 2006 Changtai Tian Xia Tong An will be the next additions.

Flavors: Broth, Butterscotch, Chestnut, Coffee, Spices, Wet Rocks

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 90 ML
apefuzz

I’m sold. Great review.

tperez

Thanks! It’s a good tea for sure

tanluwils

I was eyeing this one. Glad someone reviewed it here. The butterscotch and chestnut notes with teas good viscosity had me sold. Should age well.

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