Silver Needle (100 Years Old Bush)

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Creamy, Drying, Hay, Herbaceous, Lychee, Melon, Mineral, Musty, Nectar, Smoke, Sweet, Vegetal, White Chocolate, Zucchini, Baked Bread, banana, Cream, Dates, Floral, Honey, Oats, Orchid, Pleasantly Sour, Sap, Tannin, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Leafhopper
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 2 min, 0 sec 4 g 3 oz / 90 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Dry leaf is long, thin mostly dark green needles with some of of the typical white hairs. I smell some musty hay, faint smoke, rich undertone of white chocolate or cocoa butter. Taste is full of...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “Until yesterday, when I did some research, I thought all Fujian white teas were the same. However, it appears that there are two types: one from Fuding, which is sweet and fruity, and this one from...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “I thought this tea showed all the flavors one wants from a well-made white tea. I was sorry when the sample Tao sent me was steeped out. I will order this from them if it shows up online.” Read full tasting note
    87

From Tao Tea Leaf

This special silver needle was first found on the 2012 spring tea tour and is grown from tea bushes over 100 years old. Not only is this tea a silver needle, comprised entirely of soft downy buds, this specific kind of silver needle was grown from wild tea bushes over 100 years old. The size of the buds are smaller and dark greener than normal silver needle. White teas go through very little processing. The buds of the tea plants are picked early in the harvesting season before the leaves have time to bloom. The tea is sweet tasting and full bodied with an incredibly long lasting finish that will leave your mouth watering. After multiple steeps this tea takes on a more floral scent.

Region: Zhen He, Fujian Province.

About Tao Tea Leaf View company

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3 Tasting Notes

78
932 tasting notes

Dry leaf is long, thin mostly dark green needles with some of of the typical white hairs. I smell some musty hay, faint smoke, rich undertone of white chocolate or cocoa butter.

Taste is full of white chocolate, hay, melon and minerals with slight herbaceous-vegetal-zucchini tone. Nectar sweetness that I find typical of silver needles. Creamy lychee-oat aftertaste. Rather drying.

I had this a week ago and my notes were rushed, my recollection fuzzy. The flavor profile was unique and I can’t remember enough to say why. Maybe the tea had a deeper, earthier feeling to it… I really enjoyed this one, though, especially the white chocolate note which I was not expecting after reading Leafhopper’s review. It seems like our experiences with this tea differed a bit. Thanks for the share, Leafhopper :)

Note 900

Flavors: Creamy, Drying, Hay, Herbaceous, Lychee, Melon, Mineral, Musty, Nectar, Smoke, Sweet, Vegetal, White Chocolate, Zucchini

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 g 2 OZ / 60 ML
Leafhopper

Congratulations on 900 tasting notes! I definitely don’t remember getting white chocolate from this tea. Did you brew it differently?

Courtney

Woot, 900!

White Antlers

Thank you for being so wonderfully prolific,derk.

gmathis

^ my sentiments exactly.

ashmanra

Ditto ^!

derk

Thank you all for bringing some kindness to the internet :)

Leafhopper: gongfu with steeps starting at 10s. Not much different than you. This tea had me spinning in place.

Martin Bednář

900! Woot woot! Let’s go to 1000 (and even more!)

mrmopar

Big number there!

Leafhopper

Derk, yes, I also found this tea to have a lot of caffeine. I remember being pretty buzzed after my long session.

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86
268 tasting notes

Until yesterday, when I did some research, I thought all Fujian white teas were the same. However, it appears that there are two types: one from Fuding, which is sweet and fruity, and this one from Zhenghe, which is more savoury and herbaceous. It would have been nice to know that back in 2016 when I bought this tea. After even more research and the realization that there are a million contradictory ways to brew white tea, I steeped about 5 g of leaf in a 120 ml pot at 195F for 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 seconds, then for 1:15, 1:30, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 10 minutes, plus some long, uncounted steeps.

The dry aroma is of pungent herbs, smoke, hay, and wood. The first steep has notes of banana bread, honey, delicate spring flowers, pungent herbs, hay, oats, and wood. Squash and pleasant sourness emerge in the second steep. I get wood smoke in steep three, along with creamy and woody notes, although the tea remains somewhat sweet; the hay/oats/banana aftertaste lingers. By steep six, the honey florals start to intensify and I get a sappy note. As the session goes on, the orchid and spring florals poke their heads out periodically, playing off the heavier smoke, wood, sourness, and oats. This tea goes for a long time and ends with hay, oats, wood, tannins, date-like sweetness, and minerals.

Since it has few of the flavours I like and many to which I’m indifferent, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this tea. I had fun picking apart the various flavours, which were all over the map. This tea packs a caffeine punch and took all day to steep out.

Flavors: Baked Bread, banana, Cream, Dates, Floral, Hay, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Oats, Orchid, Pleasantly Sour, Sap, Smoke, Sweet, Tannin, Wood, Zucchini

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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87
52 tasting notes

I thought this tea showed all the flavors one wants from a well-made white tea. I was sorry when the sample Tao sent me was steeped out. I will order this from them if it shows up online.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 2 min, 0 sec

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