Liugui Camellia Formosensis yesheng 'shancha' 2021

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Alcohol, Astringent, Bark, Bitter, Cake, Coffee, Cream, Cucumber, Floral, Forest Floor, Green Bell Peppers, Honey, Meat, Mineral, Olives, Plant Stems, Sour, Sweet, Vegetables, Vegetal, Wood
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 5 oz / 150 ml

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  • “This is a weird tea, no kidding. It is quite pungent, warming and aromatic. At times it reminds me of Sichuan green teas, but also of FF Nepal teas, Taiwanese jade oolongs from wild varietals and...” Read full tasting note
    81

From Literárna Čajovňa

Shancha in translation means “mountain tea”. This name is used in Taiwan to refer to the original wild variety of tea tree, which, by DNA research in 2009, proved to be the original endemic Taiwanese species (related to Camelie sinensis). The combination of this Taiwanese variety and the Assamese variety of tea tree (Camelia sinensis var. Assamica) gave rise to the famous Taiwanese cultivar Ruby Red (TTES 18).

We offer you the opportunity to taste the original Taiwanese variety in its wild, wild form, processed into the style of lücha (green tea). Tea trees grow wild in a national park in the Liugui area of ​​southern Taiwan. The exact location of these trees is not publicly known, as their harvesting is prohibited. Our tea comes from trees growing in a remote area, 2 hours of hiking from the nearest road, at an altitude of 1500 m above sea level, from a master who has an exception for their collection and processing.

Although the tea is called ‘lücha’, green tea, the moment we look at the leaves and the degree of their oxidation, it is clear to us that it is not so completely a tea that we would normally include in this category.

In some ways, this tea is similar to Sheng pu-erh. The material is collected from large trees in the woods, which in itself is a very long process and it takes another two hours to carry it on the shoulders on foot from the hills. During this time, the leaves are already partially oxidizing. Before processing, they are allowed to settle for a short time and then the tea is deenzymed by hand on a hot wok, as is usually done with green tea and pu-erh.

Even in the dry state, the leaves have a very intense, playful aroma, in which we can find cocoa strudel, tomato soup with cloves, molasses and more.

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1 Tasting Note

81
749 tasting notes

This is a weird tea, no kidding. It is quite pungent, warming and aromatic. At times it reminds me of Sichuan green teas, but also of FF Nepal teas, Taiwanese jade oolongs from wild varietals and others.

Its dry aroma is a mix of oats, coffee and carrot cake. On the other hand, wet leaves have a savoury scent with notes such as cabbage, cooked meat, fenugreek leaves, olives, pickled cucumbers and a touch of smoke.

The tea has a medium body and a distinctively oily texture. First steep is vegetal (bay leaf) and sweet (honey). Second one is more bitter and mineral with a lot of woody aromatics. Aftertaste is sour, floral, and spicy. It is reminiscent of mead, plant stems, green peppers and IPA.

Third infusion is sour itself and has a bit more astringency too. It is very pungent and besides vegetal/floral notes it also has a hint of tree bark. As the tea becomes smooth over time, a creamy flavour emerges as well.

Flavors: Alcohol, Astringent, Bark, Bitter, Cake, Coffee, Cream, Cucumber, Floral, Forest Floor, Green Bell Peppers, Honey, Meat, Mineral, Olives, Plant Stems, Sour, Sweet, Vegetables, Vegetal, Wood

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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